Korean Slang: 어케

my daneo jjang

While perusing comments on Korean sites this week, I kept noticing this word, 어케, popping up. Based on the context in which it was used each time, I felt comfortable assuming it was 줄임말 (a shortened form) for 어떻게. A quick google search showed that this word indeed is frequently used in forums as an abbreviation of 어떻게 – but sometimes people confuse it with 오케이. Okay? Not quite. Note that 오 and 어 really are two very different sounds, and proper pronunciation of ‘okay’ dictates the full 오케이 spelling.

Today’s 단어!

어케: 어떻게


I’m not sure you want to start saying this to your Korean friends, however – it seems more like texting slang than anything you might actually say aloud. Also, don’t start using it in formal Korean writing.

If you like using Korean hashtags on Instagram, you can view what others have posted or use #어케어케 when you’re freaking out about something or not sure what to do. 어떡해! 어떡해! Such a quick and easy 단어짱 post!  Continue reading

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Korean Slang: 작업걸다

my daneo jjang

We’re already on my third 단어! post, where I share interesting vocabulary words I’ve encountered in conversations, shows, and reading materials. I am also happy to answer anyone who submits an interesting, difficult-to-understand Korean word of their own. Time to learn about a dating-related Korean phrase!

Today’s 단어!

작업을 걸다: to hit on someone, to make a move

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Korean Slang: 이쪽커플

my daneo jjang

안녕하세요!

It’s the second 단어! post. What’s that, you ask? Sometimes when I encounter interesting vocabulary words in shows and reading materials, I find it difficult to find their meanings – this new series aims to introduce random, interesting vocab to other self-taught students. I am also happy to answer anyone who submits an interesting, difficult-to-understand Korean word of their own.


Today’s 단어!

이쪽커플: gay or lesbian couple

My friend stumbled upon this hashtag on Instagram, and it seems that some members of the Korean LGBTQ community uses this hashtag to identify themselves – for example, on Instagram, mainly self-identified lesbian couples are posting couple selfies under this hashtag. This website defines the term as applicable to and the most commonly used phrase for both gay and lesbian couples.

이쪽: this way, this direction

커플: couple

From the above website, which also introduces other related 용어, or slang terms:

이쪽 : 게이와 레즈비언이 모두 사용하는 용어로 이반과 같은 의미를 가지고 있다. 현재는 이반이라는 용어는 많이 사용하지 않고 ‘이쪽’이라는 용어를 많이 사용한다. ‘이쪽’은 울타리와 같은 의미로 ‘이쪽 사람들’을 찾아 소통하거나 만남을 갖는다.

If you’ve ever paid attention to dialogue in genderswap dramas, you may have noticed that Koreans often use “이쪽” or 그쪽” to indirectly say that they are or are not gay. English has some similarities, where some people might carefully say, “I don’t swing that way,” to say that they’re not hetero- or homosexual, depending on the situation.

Hopefully this 단어! post was interesting and helpful! 열공~

지금 재생 중:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1OJ2LdrRy4

Korean Slang: 엽사

my daneo jjang

안녕하세요!

This is my first 단어! post, so I am excited to introduce my 서울드림 followers to a new blog series as I resume intensive self-study of Korean. I just graduated with a dual undergraduate degree in Korean Studies and International Studies, and I am taking a year off before grad school to work, to write, and to improve my Korean – which means regular 서울드림 posts again! Sorry, 서울드림, my thesis kept me away for too long…

Sometimes when I encounter interesting vocabulary words in shows and reading materials, I find it difficult to find their meanings – this new series aims to introduce random, interesting vocab to other self-taught students. I am also happy to answer anyone who submits an interesting, difficult-to-understand Korean word of their own.


Today’s 단어!

엽기사진 (엽사): funny photo

Continue reading